Archive | February, 2014

First Airborne WiFi Virus Demonstrated

Original Article: http://scienceblog.com/70678/scientists-demonstrate-first-contagious-airborne-wifi-virus/ This new development is yet another example of the security vulnerabilities inherent in most wireless routers and why securing them with strong encryption and passwords is critical.  Essentially, a virus can now infect, reside in, and spread from a wireless router to other wireless routers within range.  This is of great concern […]

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Is Open Source Software Really a Viable Option for Small Businesses?

Original article:  https://opensource.com/business/14/2/open-source-alternatives-for-small-businesses Short answer:  Yes, and it goes far beyond saving money.  Open source software also tends to be more secure and patches for any flaws are usually released much faster than with proprietary software. Proprietary software is a business model for making profit.  When you “buy” a copy of Microsoft Office, for example, […]

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Biggest Security Threat to Users? – Wireless Routers

Original Link:  http://it.slashdot.org/story/14/02/19/1435202/routers-pose-biggest-security-threat-to-home-networks This is something that has been going on for years and is one of the first things I check when analyzing a network:  Router manufacturers routinely sacrifice security for usability, meaning that unsuspecting home users who buy a new wireless router for their home, plug it in and start using it “out […]

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Metadata Collection & Its Impact On Your Privacy

Original article here: https://slashdot.org/topic/bi/gracenote-big-metadata-player/ But before you read the article, what is metadata?  Simply put, metadata is data about data, and it is everywhere.  Take a selfie with your cell phone?  That photo is loaded with metadata potentially containing information about the time, date and location the photo was taken, the weather conditions, the name […]

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